September 1943, Italy



In early Fall 1943 the Allied forces conducted a 3 prong attack on the southern main land of Italy. By then the Italians were chaffing under the yolk of Axis power and the leaders of the invasion though it would be easy to gain a victory there. The Italian people recently deposed and captured Benito Mussolini while half of the Italian army remained loyal to the Axis forces and the other half became neutral. As a side note: Mussolini was rescued by an elite German S.S. Squad and they began to head North towards Germany. The rumors that the deposed Italian dictator and his dark saviors escaped by sprouting “Bat-Wings” and flying away have been classified as Top-Secret by the O.S.I.

The Invasion would consist of 3 landing sites. The “Toe” and “Heel” of the Italian peninsula were to be distractions lead by General Montgomery and his British 8th Army so that Operation Avalanche lead by General Walker and his U.S. 5th Army could gain surprise against the German forces 300 miles to the north in Salerno Bay. The Avalanche plan was daring but flawed in two ways. First the Germans did not fall for Montgomery’s ruse and remained in bulk at Salerno and secondly the Fifth Army would be landing on a very broad 35 mi (56 km) front, using only three assault divisions, one of which was the ill-fated 36th.


Because the main invasion at Salerno by the U.S. 5th Army tried to gain surprise, the Army decided to assault without preliminary naval or aerial bombardment. However, tactical surprise was not achieved. As the first wave of the U.S. 36th Infantry Division approached the shore a loudspeaker from the enemy lines proclaimed in English: “Come on in and give up. We have you covered.” The Allied troops attacked nonetheless and received heavy losses. For the next couple of days, the Allies fought to expand their beachhead while the Germans defended stubbornly to mask the build-up of their reinforcements for a counter-offensive soon to lead by Generaloberst Vietinghoff and his German 10th Army.

The Allied build-up was constrained by the limited transport available for the operation and the pre-determined schedule of the build-up based on how, during the planning phase, it had been anticipated the battle would develop. Two days after the initial assault it had become clear that 5th Army had an acute shortage of infantry on the ground.


As the battle for Salerno waged on the Allied 36th Division over ran what they thought was an Axis headquarters in a church in one of the older section of the town. General Walker then made the discovery that the church was a site of occult German witchery where strange rites and arcane studies had been going on for some time. He then reported via secure radio his seizing of the “Uruku Document” A sheaf of greasy, black papers originally made in Ancient Sumeria and the focus point of the dark rituals. On the evening of the next day Generaloberst Vietinghoff posed a counter attack and pushed the Allies out of Salerno. The fighting was fierce and the German counter offensive nearly wiped out General Walkers 36th Division.

Generaloberst Vietinghoff’s battle groups continued their strike south and south-west until reaching the confluence of the Sele River and its large tributary, where he was stopped by Allied artillery firing over open sights, British naval gunfire and a makeshift infantry position manned by artillerymen, drivers, cooks and clerks and anyone else that Walker could scrape together from the tattered remains of the 36th.

As it stands now, both forces have entrenched themselves along the 35 miles of coastline, the Northernmost point being in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius and the middle being the war torn town of Salerno. If Generaloberst Vietinghoff, using the remaining Italian militia and his own crack German soldiers of the German 10th Army, could destroy the dug-in forces of the U.S. 5th Army it would give the Axis a regrouping point to launch multiple attacks to the Allied held south. If General Walker can hold his position a little longer, it might buy enough time for General Montgomery to march his battle ready troops 300 miles into Salerno and push back the Germans.

If.



The WLA is a model of Harley-Davidson motorcycle that was produced to US Army specifications in the years during and around World War II. It was based on an existing civilian model, the WL, and is of the 45 solo type, so called due to its 45 cubic inches (740 cc) engine and single-rider design. The US Army would use motorcycles for police and escort work, courier duties, and some scouting, as well as limited use to transport radio and radio suppression equipment. Allied motorcycles were almost never used as combat vehicles or for troop mobility, and so were rarely equipped with sidecars as was common on the German side. Nevertheless, the WLA acquired the nickname “Liberator”, since it was seen ridden by soldiers liberating occupied Europe.


Capt gray 2


De medici 2


Reinhard heydrich


Uruku


Telegraph Records

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FROM GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY
TO— O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY

  • Was informed to report to you about matter.
  • Captured Nazi S.S.Headquarters
  • Identified multiple arcane books and items.
  • Key document labled “Uruku.” Sumarien circa 2,500 B.C.
  • Heavy enemy counter attack. Forced to abandon site.
  • Have retained “Uruku.” Awaiting instructions.

*
*

FROM O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY
TO— GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY

  • “Uruku Document” Known to offices of O.S.I.
  • IMMEDIATE-IMMEDIATE-IMMEDIATE transport of documents from Salerno to Sardinia field office.
  • Have detected movments of a top German Official relocating to your area.
  • Regard with utmost caution.

FROM GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY
TO— O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY

  • Massive counter attack by Veitinghoff initiated.
  • Unable to comply with previous order.
  • NEEDED:soldiers, weapons, ammunition, food [List To Follow]
  • Will transport “Uruku Document” after 5th Army resupplied.

FROM O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY
TO— GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY

  • Comply with previous O.S.I. directive.
  • Failure to do so may lead to Review Of Conduct.
  • TRANSPORTURUKU DOCUMENTSIMMEDIATELY.

FROM GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY
TO— O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY

  • Unable to comply.
  • Send reinforcements first, then you get document.

FROM O.S.I. FIELD OFFICE-SICILY
TO— GEN.WALKER-5TH ARMY-SALERNO ITALY

  • Reinforcements inbound.

September 1943, Italy

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